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Report/Study ODS template Proactive detection of security incidents II - Honeypots
An increasing number of complex attacks demand improved early warning detection capabilities for CERTs. By having threat intelligence collected without any impact on production infrastructure, CERTs can better defend their constituencies assets. Honeypots are powerful tools that can be used to achieve this goal. This document is the final report of the ‘Proactive Detection of Security Incidents: Honeypots’ study.
Located in Publications
Report/Study Good Practice Guide on Vulnerability Disclosure. From challenges to recommendations
Vulnerabilities are ‘flaws’ or ‘mistakes’ in computer-based systems that may be exploited to compromise the network and information security of affected systems. They provide a point-of-entry or gateway to exploit a system and as such pose potentially severe security risks. Fixing vulnerabilities is therefore crucial and the process of disclosing vulnerabilities is a vital component that cannot be underestimated.
Located in Publications
Report/Study Scalable and Accepted Methods for Trust Building
One of ENISA’s role is that of community builder. In order to properly fulfill this role, ENISA must have a better insight at what makes or breaks a community – trust. This report takes a first informal look at how communities build and maintain trust, by looking at four different operational communities. This report highlights commonalities and differences, and gives a first set of recommendations to enhance trust in a community.
Located in Publications
Report/Study text/texmacs Detect, SHARE, Protect - Solutions for Improving Threat Data Exchange among CERTs
The focus of this report is on the threat and incident information exchange and sharing practices used among CERTs in Europe, especially, but not limited to, national/governmental CERTs. It aims at: - Taking stock of existing communication solutions and practices among European CERTs - Identifying the functional and technical gaps that limit threat intelligence exchange between n/g CERTs and their counterparts in Europe, as well as other CERTs within their respective countries - Defining basic requirements for improved communications interoperable with existing solutions
Located in Publications
Report/Study Troff document 8th ENISA Workshop ‘CERTs in Europe’ report
This document is a brief ENISA report on the annual workshop for Computer Emergency Response Teams in Europe “CERTs in Europe”. The first part of the workshop focused on hands-on technical training for non- governmental CERTs in Europe. Part II of the workshop, the ENISA/EC3 workshop, is a follow up event to last years's workshop with Europol and it has the same focus on cooperation between n/g CERTs in Europe and their national law enforcement counterparts.
Located in Publications
Report/Study text/texmacs Baseline capabilities for national / governmental CERTs (Part 1 Operational Aspects)
This document constitutes a very first attempt to define a minimum set of capabilities that a Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT) in charge of protecting critical information infrastructure (CIIP) in the Member States should possess to take part and contribute to a sustainable cross-border information sharing and cooperation. In areas where no clear statements can be made with regards to requirements the document points out recommendations and areas for further analysis in the future. This first version was derived from the answers to a survey ENISA carried out among all 120+ publicly listed CERTs in Europe. It should be considered only as a first step towards the specification of requirements, which is an ongoing process that has and will involve discussions with the relevant stakeholders in the Member States.
Located in Publications
Report/Study Baseline Capabilities of National/Governmental CERTs (Part 2 Policy Recommendations)
This document constitutes a very first attempt to define policy recommendations of capabilities that a Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT) in charge of protecting critical information infrastructure (CIIP) in the Member States should possess to take part and contribute to a sustainable cross-border information sharing and cooperation.
Located in Publications
Report/Study Flyer - Baseline Capabilities of National/Governmental CERTs - Summary
Since 2009 ENISA has actively worked on defining a minimum set of capabilities that a Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT) in charge of protecting critical information infrastructures in the European Union Member States should possess in order to take part in and contribute to sustainable cross-border information sharing and cooperation. Recommendations on baseline capabilities, created in 2009, have an operational/technical nature and have been very well accepted by the CERT community. In 2010 ENISA has made further improvements and presents a set of policy recommendations on baseline capabilities of national/governmental CERTs.
Located in Publications
Report/Study Pascal source code Report on 7th ENISA CERT Workshop
ENISA and Europol organised jointly the 7th annual CERT Workshop, Part II, as a follow up event to the very successful 6th Annual CERT workshop1 held last year in Prague, Czech Republic. This year the workshop was held at the Europol premises in The Hague on 16-17 October 2012. The focus remained on cooperation between national/governmental CERTs (n/g CERTs) in Europe and their national Law Enforcement counterparts (LEAs).
Located in Publications
Report/Study Deployment of Baseline Capabilities of n/g CERTs - Status Report 2012
This document will familiarise the reader with the current situation in Europe with regards to the n/g CERTs' capabilities, and how these capabilities are deployed.
Located in Publications

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